Cursive Fonts: Most Popular Typefaces, Best for Webfonts

Before delving to cursive fonts, it is important to understand where they came from. Cursive is also known as script or joint writing and is a unique form of handwriting in which the language symbols are conjointly written in a flowing style.

The initial purpose of cursive writing was to create a smoother, faster way to write. Nevertheless, some forms of cursive writing do not actually contain conjoined forms. For example, formal cursive writing uses conjoined styles while casual scriptwriting may contain joints and lifts. In other cultures, particularly Cyrillic and Arabic, the letters tend to be joined at the ends and in certain situations; they look like there is a string of undulating strokes to depict a word or statement.

Also, cursive does not really mean curves. The term cursive was derived from the French word “cursif” and Medieval Latin “cursivus” which meant “running.”

Cursive in typography

When it comes to cursive fonts, there is a slight difference between script fonts and the prior. Script fonts, technically speaking, are the fonts that offer fluid strokes similar to that of handwriting. The variants of script fonts include the formal types and the casual forms. Formal scripts are often used in invitations and diplomas while the casual scripts are often used for other purposes due to their informal appeal. When it comes to cursive fonts, the style often is un-joined hand writing. The style of a cursive font often depicts brush lettering and often, the small letters are not attached to each other.

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